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Peculiar Treasures: Compass, shovel, digging in

By Kellie Purcill

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Over here in Australia we’re slipping into Autumn, and over in America you’re losing an hour’s sleep and waiting for Spring…while we’re all waiting for the weather to change, let’s have a look at some peculiar treasures!

First up, there’s been discussion about kids having no moral compass. No, that kids have a moral compass but it’s broken. No, actually, kids have a moral compass it’s adults who are asking the wrong questions… Here’s the initial article arguing that kids aren’t being taught moral truths, just options, and a later piece disagreeing on multiple fronts.

Too much moral weight and argument too soon in the week? Have a piece of pay it forward pizza instead. Warm, stretchy fuzzies guaranteed. Then there’s an open letter to all (possibly lonely) Moms of older kids to boost and encourage you, and a glimpse into how a Mom helped save her daughter and their relationship through poetry.

Neil Gaiman has said thank you for all the fish (in a manner of speaking) to Douglas Adams, and this NPR interview with Modest Mouse discusses how a long process isn’t a bad thing when creating.

If you’d like something easy on the eyes, there’s findings that looking at art keeps you fit inside and out, and the man who makes art inside cliffs that you can wander around, on, under and through.

There have been many words added to the dictionary in recent years, but what about the surprising words that have been removed? Try your words with one of the most bookish spelling tests I’ve seen in years (examples feature Mr Darcy, vampires and bookshelf organisation).

Finally, this week’s First Draft Poetry, a found poem crafted by Sandra from the Modest Mouse interview, titled Strangers to Ourselves:

it’s not a race

to have something to say

 

needing time

to fill my head

 

try on a lot

in the interim

 

beekeeping, foraging

I spent time

 

In the woods in Oregon

It’s easy to lose track of time

About Kellie Purcill

lives way on the other side of the planet in her native Australia and gives thanks for the internet regularly. She loves books, her boys, panna cotta, collecting words, being a redhead and not putting things in order of importance when listing items. She credits writing as a major contributing factor to surviving her life with sanity mostly intact, though her (in)sanity level is subject to change without warning.

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