Submit Your Work

Segullah features literary and visual art created by Latter-day Saint women. We encourage contributions from beginners as well as practiced amateurs and professionals.

We accept electronic submissions only. Simultaneous submissions are permitted; we ask only that you let us know in your cover letter if your work is being submitted elsewhere. If your work is accepted for publication after submission to Segullah, please let us know. Submissions not used in the forthcoming issue of Segullah may be held, with the author’s permission, for possible use in later issues.

By submitting work to Segullah, contributors accept the terms of our copyright policy below.

Submissions are accepted throughout the year. Work submitted between January 15th and March 15th will automatically be entered in our annual contest.

Submission Guidelines

This policy pertains to journal issues and all other website material. For use and permission inquiries, or more information about our copyright policy, contact us. Inquiries about individual pieces will be forwarded to the respective author/artist.

By submitting work to Segullah, contributors implicitly license The Segullah Group to print, re-print, distribute, and display their work, in whole or in part, in print and web versions of the journal, without compensation of any kind. Published authors retain full rights over their work, and may submit their work to other publications after it has appeared in Segullah without obtaining permission; however, Segullah should be acknowledged as the place of first publication.

Authors who quote from other works must secure any necessary permissions and will be responsible for any infractions of copyright law within their pieces.

We are interested in personal essays, lyrical essays, experimental essays, short memoirs, and other works of creative nonfiction written by LDS women on subjects in harmony with our mission. Please read a variety of pieces from our archive to understand what we are looking for. Submissions should be between 750-5000 words.

Message from the CNF editor: I look for fresh and interesting work—either new ideas or old truths presented in creative ways. Stylistic choices that skirt convention are welcome as long as they compel rather than distract. A previous editor explained, “I especially encourage experimentation in form and heightened attention to language.”

I subscribe to “Show, don’t tell!” In short, use adjectives sparingly and give the reader more snapshots. Use literary devices. Avoid platitudes and clichés. (e.g. “She looked down, twirling one strand of hair around her finger” instead of “She was embarrassed.”) Sometimes writers worry that the more specific we write, the less readers will relate. The opposite is true! Bring us into your moment with you. We’re human. We’ll understand, or at least be interested. 

You will receive an automated email response confirming our receipt of your submission.

Submissions accepted for publication are subject to revision under the guidance of an editor.

We are interested in short fiction written by LDS women that touches on subjects in harmony with our mission. Please read a variety of pieces from our archive to understand what we are looking for. Submissions should be between 750-5000 words.

Message from the fiction editor: As a genre, fiction allows writers the freedom to tell any story in any way they choose. As a reader, I am interested in submissions which develop complex characters and tell engaging stories dealing with themes directly and tangentially important to LDS women. I particularly enjoy reading work that offers a fresh and fearless narrative voice, that experiments with storytelling techniques, and that engages rich and original plots through vibrant language. Similarly, I am uninterested in stories that come across as didactic, moralistic, or heavy handed. Surprise me, delight me, break my heart, and leave me wanting more.

You will receive an automated email response confirming our receipt of your submission.

Submissions accepted for publication are subject to revision under the guidance of an editor.

We accept submissions of poetry written by women of Latter-day Saint culture that address subjects in harmony with our mission. Please peruse our archive, to get a sense of the poetry we publish. Submit up to three poems in separate documents. Please choose your best, most polished pieces to exemplify your writing.

We are looking for poems that are multi-layered, well crafted, with original expression and vivid imagery. Poetry should lead the reader somewhere unexpected, enlarge our understanding of ourselves and the world, and invite re-reading in order to discover deeper meaning. We like poems that lead us to ponder spiritual themes blended into our daily lives. To be more specific:

What we like:

  • Original, concrete language and images
  • Strong verbs and nouns
  • Subtlety; use of implication and juxtaposition
  • Unique voice using unique words
  • Sound (internal rhyme, consonance)
  • Well done forms (use of enjambment, near rhyme, metaphor)
  • Honest and authentic, yet still faith-promoting (adhering to Segullah’s mission)

What we avoid:

  • Poems that sound like hymns or primary songs
  • Didactic (don’t preach or testify, especially on the last line)
  • Prosaic (it shouldn’t sound like an essay with line breaks)
  • Poems that sound like you are talking to someone
  • Wordiness
  • Obscurity and abstraction
  • Poems that look like they didn’t go through any drafts

Additional Requirements:

  • Please check your spelling carefully, since any unusual spelling in a poem will be considered intentional.
  • Include your full name, address, phone number, and email address at the top of each page.

You will receive an automated email response confirming our receipt of your submission.

Submissions accepted for publication are subject to revision under the guidance of an editor.

We welcome submissions of visual art created by Latter-day Saint women on a variety of subjects in harmony with our mission. Our archives identify the artists we have featured in the past. We typically feature three artists per year which includes a prominent feature in our journal and shared through our social media. As a featured artist, multiple works will be featured in various forums.

We accept digital images of 2D and 3D art, including drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture, mixed media, ceramics, woodcut, fabric and textile art for each submission. General submissions require 5 images while there is no minimum for contest submissions.

You will receive an automated email response confirming our receipt of your submission.

Submissions selected for publication are generally cropped to meet specific formatting.

We follow the Chicago Manual of Style (15th ed.). To make the editing process run more smoothly, we ask authors to format their works as follows:

  • Single space after punctuation marks and in between sentences. This is the current publishing industry standard. If you prepared your manuscript using two spaces after periods and colons, please remove the extra spaces. (An easy way to check for extra spaces is to use the “show ¶” command in your word processing program.)
  • Single space between lines.
  • Double space between paragraphs. Do not indent at the beginning of paragraphs.
  • Use a plain font in 12-point size.
  • Allow the program to wrap the right edge automatically.
  • If documentation is required, use endnotes.
  • Include your full name, phone number, e-mail address and street address at the beginning of your email.
  • Include your essay’s title near the beginning of the email.
  • Proofread carefully. There are many errors that your word processing program will not identify. We suggest having someone else read your manuscript and offer suggestions.

If you have additional questions about style, you can find the fifteenth edition of the Chicago Manual of Style at most libraries and bookstores.

A personal essay features life experiences that illustrate an idea. Essayist Edward Hoaglund explains that an essay “hangs somewhere between two sturdy poles: this is what I think, and this is what I am.” Your idea—what I think—is the core of the essay; it need not be stated explicitly, but it does need to be clear. The style and voice you use in communicating your idea reveals aspects of yourself—“what I am.”

We are looking for essays that:

  • Use the first person.
  • Speak from a place of familiarity, focusing on the details unique to your own experience.
  • Employ effective story-telling techniques (such as blending of scene and summary; imagery and five-sense appeal; characterization; active verb; “show not tell”).
  • Rely on subtle meaning and avoid heavy-handed moralizing.
  • Feature an authentic voice. This requires honesty about your feelings and ideas.
  • Use structure to emphasize meaning. You might try coming at your issue from a variety of different angles rather than using a methodical approach. An essay’s structure may be braided, fragmented, fluid (stream-of-consciousness), or more conventional.
  • Consider other points of view. Exploring conflicting ideas may lend depth to your essay’s meaning.

Through employing these techniques, you may move beyond merely reporting an experience or evidencing a point to creating insightful, personable literary art. Essayist Philip Lopate emphasizes, “While it is true that historically the essay is related to rhetoric, it seeks to persuade more by the delights of literary style than anything else.”

You may also find the articles filed under writing tips to be helpful.

References:

Edward Hoaglund, The Tugman’s Passage (New York: Random House, 1982), 25.

The Art of the Personal Essay, Phillip Lopate, ed. (NY: Anchor Books Doubleday, 1994), 301.

If you have additional style questions, you can find the fifteenth edition of the Chicago Manual of Style at most libraries and bookstores.

Submission Form