Home

By Linda Hoffman Kimball

My husband Chris Kimball has a new book out called “Living on the Edge of the Inside: a Survival Guide.” It’s published by BCC Press. He describes it this way: “This book is for people like me who have concerns about the Church that make leaving a genuine consideration, but have decided or chosen or …

Read More

Loving a Person with NPD: Can You Hug a Porcupine?

By Karen Austin

Image by Teton via Creative Commons Over the last few weeks, I have opened Twitter to find trending content relating to trial featuring Johnny Depp and Amber Heard.  While I am not qualified to assess the mental disorders that these celebrities might be manifesting, their issues have given me cause to think about how I …

Read More

Further Light and Ambiguity

By Linda Hoffman Kimball

For over a week now I have rejoiced and grieved/danced and wept/ felt free-at-last and still a tad bit bound. Sorry to be so oblique. I’m sorry, also, that I have been instructed that “oblique” is the best I can do. (That isn’t an apology; it’s a regret.) The other day, weighed with these joys …

Read More

Flurries

By Markay Brown

I first tasted snow when I was five. Frozen doilies, one after one, melted on my tongue, tingling as ice cream. When I was a teen on the track’s wrong side, snow sanitized the rubbish tossed out neighbors’ doors. Rusted cars, embarrassed without wheels, wore hoods of sparkling white and every sore house looked like …

Read More

Peculiar Treasures & First Draft Poem

By Linda Hoffman Kimball

This week’s Segullah bloggers’ Peculiar Treasures provide another diverse array of online bits of wit and wisdom. Denise Stirk offers thoughts on the strong bonds of the shared experience of motherhood. She finds in those bonds both consolation and increased capacity to mourn with those that mourn. Business leader and author Margaret Heffernan explores the …

Read More

Strategies for Managing Conflict

By Karen Austin

 

Photo by Soggydan

“It’s been a crazy day. Let’s go out for dinner, honey.   We can go to the pizza joint around the corner. “

“Well, eating out is a good idea, but that place has a carb heavy menu, so let’s go to the soup and salad place instead.”

“Um, it’s pricey, and it’s on the other side of town.”

Every day we work with others to manage conflicts—large or small.   Organizational behaviorists have outlined five basic strategies for managing conflict: 1) Collaborating 2) Compromising 3) Accommodating 4) Competing and 5) Avoiding.

I noticed that each of these strategies takes a position on how much to take the other person’s view into account and how assertive to be during discussion.  By poking around, I found a couple of diagrams that plot these strategies’ differences. On the one extreme, avoiding shows low regard for self, others and the process.  Competing is the opposite extreme by showing the most assertion and self-interest.

Read More

Blogging in Zion

By Kathyrn Lynard

My remarks from “Across Web Time, Cyberspace, and Blogging Disciplines,” a panel discussion moderated by Mormon Times columnist Emily Jensen at BYU’s Mormon Media Studies Symposium yesterday. Great to see those of you who attended!

It may seem suspect to draw a connection between blogging and Zion. Blogging is often maligned–and sometimes rightfully so–as navel gazing, and in Mormon culture those bare midriffs can seem awfully immodest. To be sure, self-absorption is the antithesis of the Zion we seek as a people. But while Mormon bloggers have their fair share of narcissism, I believe most are motivated by a worthy desire to understand and be understood. And I believe such understanding is a powerful catalyst for building Zion, that longed-for state of spiritual unity where the saints are of one heart and one mind, and have no poor among them.

Read More