Home

Interview with Award Winning Sculptor Annette Everett

By Linda Hoffman Kimball

Segullah: We’re are excited to have you – a gifted sculptor – as our featured artist this season, Annette. Tell us a little about growing up and the places you have called “home”. Annette: I was raised in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains just outside of Spokane, Washington. After college and marriage, my husband was in …

Read More

Howard Gardner and Encountering the Divine

By Karen Austin

Because the pandemic has altered the way my family and I worship, this has given me an opportunity to think about what activities create opportunity for encountering the Divine and expressing devotion.  I have found myself using the theory of multiple intelligences by Howard Gardner as a schema for exploring how to be inspired and …

Read More

Autumn Journal Featured Artist Aimee Bonham: Fine Artist and Street Painter

By Linda Hoffman Kimball

Segullah: It’s been a privilege to have your sumptuous images grace our journal pages this quarter. Tell us a little about yourself. How about starting from the beginning – where you were born, to whom, something about your family and early influences. Aimee: I was born in St. George UT in 1975 to Evonne and …

Read More

HOLY ENVY, Batman!

By Linda Hoffman Kimball

Swedish theologian and New Testament scholar Krister Stendahl (1921-2008) created Stendahl’s three rules of religious understanding. Those rules are:

1. When you are trying to understand another religion, you should ask the adherents of that religion and not its enemies.
2. Don’t compare your best to their worst.
3. Leave room for “holy envy.” (By this Stendahl meant that you should be willing to recognize elements in the other religious tradition or faith that you admire and wish could, in some way, be reflected in your own religious tradition or faith.)

Regarding Rule #1: When I was a Protestant teenager, our youth Sunday School

Read More

A Portrait in Green

By Linda Hoffman Kimball

                        My daughter arrived the other day with her husband, their two little girls and a trailer full of plants. While their family waits for their new home in Colorado to be completed, we enjoy their company and the extra oxygen the plants provide …

Read More

Generations: a Four Patch Block

By Linda Hoffman Kimball

IMG_2570

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patch One

When my mother died in 1994 I inherited her stash of quilting fabrics. Since she lived by the premise, “She who dies with the most fabric, wins,” this was quite a substantial treasure. My two sisters and I – and our children – were the lucky recipients of her quilting and sewing projects over the years.

Not long after her death I had a dream in which my sisters and I were tense, still grief stricken and frantically scurrying about her house trying to get the chaos tamed before trucks came to remove all her belongings. I kept opening closets and bureaus and cedar chests and from each of them flounced out quilt after quilt she’d made for us. I hollered to my sisters, “It’s going to be okay! Look! She left us so many comforters!”

That word “comforters” was so blissfully layered with immediate meaning. Her warmth, her love, her creativity, her spirit – as well as the Spirit was overflowing and consoling at a much-needed time.

Read More

Turf Wars, Talents and Spiritual Gifts

By Karen Austin

Photo by Royce Bair

In the last 30 years, I have been a member of about a dozen different wards.  With each move, I must establish new friendships and create a niche among my fellow saints. Church is a place for shared faith, but it is also a place where many perform a skill that may or may not be related to one’s professional training.  If it’s a skill that a sister does not use at work, this often makes church a particularly important venue for expressing that skill.

In each ward I’ve attended, I see sisters who are known for one of these skills: the sister who arranges the flowers at ward events, the sister who can cook for a crowd, the sister who sings solos, the sister who grows vegetables, and so on.  I admit that I often strive to establish the following identities: the sister who creates flyers, the sister who reads the most, and the sister who keeps good records.   If I move into a ward and another set of sisters occupy all three of these positions, I find myself in a panic. I don’t sing, I can’t decorate anything, and I don’t know how to cook for more than six people.  Yes, I want to be useful, but I also want to be unique.

Read More

Munching on a Parable

By Linda Hoffman Kimball

                        The parable of the talents bugs me, so I have spent some time wrestling with it, chomping on it, working some useful meaning from it into my bones. I like that that the wealthy man gives the same reward to both servants who …

Read More

The Healing Power of Creativity

By Michelle Lehnardt

Photobucket

“In the first weeks after the death of my daughter,” Lisa told me, “I couldn’t even look at my sewing machine or my quilts or any of the creative things I’d always loved.”

“There didn’t seem to be any point,” she continued, “what was the use of my silly projects in this life where you can’t take anything with you.”

“But one day my sweet husband said to me, “Maybe your quilts will help you heal. Maybe you can use your talents to help others heal?”

Read More